National: Cool temperatures in Southeast this weekend

7:22 PM, Aug 16, 2013   |    comments
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Heavy rainfall and strong thunderstorms developed across the Southeast again on Friday, as a stationary front lingered over the region.

The system continued pulling moisture in from the Gulf of Mexico, allowing for warm and humid conditions to persist. These conditions were favorable for thunderstorm development with heavy rainfall and flooding. Heaviest precipitation across the region was reported in Camden, S.C., with a midday total of 3.89 inches. Flood watches and advisories have been issued across the region as rainfall totals over 3 inches were anticipated from the panhandle of Florida through the Carolinas.

Behind this activity in the Plains, a few scattered thunderstorms developed over Texas and Oklahoma as a trough of low pressure moved southeastward and combined with the active weather in the Southeast.

Some storms turned severe over Texas with strong and damaging winds. Strong winds blew down 12 inch in diameter tree limbs in Hamilton and sheet metal was blown off a barn near Stephenville. Childress reported a midday total of 2.08 inches of rain.

North of this activity, a ridge of high pressure built over the Great Lakes and Northeast. This brought dry and pleasant conditions to the Midwest and Northeast on Friday.

In the West, a weak system over the Pacific Northwest triggered a few more scattered rain showers. Heavy rainfall was not reported across Oregon or Washington.

FRIDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................107 Phoenix, Ariz.

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................108 Tampa Macdill AFB, Fla.

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................32 West Yellowstone, Mont.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................31 Mt. Washington, N.H.

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................55 Wichita Falls, Texas

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................3.89 Camden, S.C.

ON THIS DATE....... The weather played a big part in helping America gain its independence. The Battle of Bennington was fought on this date in 1777 about 10 miles from its namesake Bennington, Vermont, after a one day delay due to rain. British reinforcements were delayed due to the rain, thus allowing the Americans to defeat two smaller armies rather than one large army.

The Associated Press

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