Weather across the nation: 11/19/12

5:30 PM, Nov 19, 2012   |    comments
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The most active weather in the country Monday occurred in the Northwest as a Pacific storm slammed into the region.

This storm produced rain and high elevation snow in Washington and Oregon before creeping into Idaho as the day progressed. This precipitation will continue for the rest of the day before being reinforced by another storm from the Gulf of Alaska on Tuesday.

This area also experienced strong winds as High Wind Warnings warned of wind gusts to 65 mph through the evening. This strong wind will also continue into Tuesday.

Meanwhile, a weak cold front moved through the Plains toward the Upper Midwest and Mississippi Valley. This feature lacked ample moisture that produce light to occasionally heavy rain from Oklahoma through Illinois and southern Michigan.

Elsewhere, a high pressure system along the eastern seaboard kept the eastern third of the country dry while also keeping a storm in the Atlantic Ocean well away from the coast.

Generally mild conditions also continued on Monday. The Northeast rose into the 40s and 50s, while the Southeast saw temperatures in the 60s and 70s. The Southern Plains rose into the 70s and 80s, while the Northern Plains saw temperatures in the 40s and 50s. The Southwest rose into the 60s, 70s, and some 80s.

MONDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................82 Weslaco, Texas

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................84 Keahole Point, Hawaii

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................1 Springfield, Vt.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-54 Eagle, Alaska

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................69 Astoria, Ore.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................2.84 Shelton, Wash.

ON THIS DATE....... The Fujita scale's developer died on this date in 1998. Theodore Fujita developed the scale to classify the damage caused by tornadoes. He was also credited for the discovery of sudden, severe downdrafts called microbursts. He controversially blamed microbursts for the crash of a 1975 airliner. This assertion was ignored for years before it became accepted by meteorologists.

The Associated Press

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